Thursday, July 25, 2013

Nutella Cheesecake Muffins

http://www.justapinch.com/recipes/dessert/cake/nutella-cheesecake-muffins.html?p=15&source=socFB_nutella-cheesecake


Nutella Cheesecake Muffins
added by Diana Carver
I love cheesecake and making bite size version is my way of enjoying different flavors without having a huge cake to eat!
Cook time: 25 Min  Prep time: 15 Min  Serves: 1 dozen
Ingredients
1 pkg cream cheese, room temperature- important (8 oz)
1/2 c sugar
1/2 stick butter, room temperature
1/3-1/2 c nutella
1 Tbsp vanilla extract
1/4 c sour cream
2 eggs - room temp - important
cookies of your choice that goes well with nutella
cupcake liners
Directions
1. Remove your pan from the broiler and fill the pan with several cups of water. Place the pan of water in the oven on the bottom rack. Set oven temp to 275 degrees.
2. Cookies or graham crackers of your choice. If you use graham crackers mash one sleeve full and mix with some melted butter about 2 tablespoon full. Line your cupcake pan with the liners. This recipe makes exactly 1 dozen! Using a spoon you can put two spoonfuls of cookie crumbs on the bottom of each cupcake liner. If you choose to use a regular cookie, like a nilla wafer , just place one cookie at the bottom of each liner. TRUST ME! This works and won’t burn!!
3. Now beat cream cheese, sugar and butter and until smooth. Add in your desired amount of Nutella, I did 1/3 and thought it was good. Blend it all in then add vanilla and the sour cream. Blend again. Add one egg and blend for a good minute, then add the other one and blend again for a full minute. Don’t over do it or toss in both at once. You will notice it will be a little soupy, that’s ok! Pour it into a large cup that you can easily pour into the cupcake liners. Fill each liner to the top or almost. It will rise a little but not too much that it would over flow. Place the pan in the middle shelf of the oven over the pan of water and bake for 25 minutes. When its done let it sit for a moment on the stove top so it cools enough to place in the fridge. DO NOT TAKE THEM OUT OF THE PAN!!! They need to cool for a few hours in the fridge to set up properly. When ready to eat, feel free to dollop whipped cream on top! Enjoy!

Wednesday, July 24, 2013

How to Make Dill Pickles for Beginners

http://www.harvesttotable.com/2013/07/how-to-make-dill-pickles-for-beginners/?utm_source=feedly

How to Make Dill Pickles for Beginners

Dill pickles from cucumbers and dill sprigs
Dill pickles from cucumbers and dill sprigs
You can turn cucumbers into pickles in about 40 minutes. It’s not difficult.
My favorite pickling cucumbers are County Fair, National Pickling, Pickle Bush, Regal, and Saladin. Pickling cucumbers are short–4 inches is about the right length–and compact with tender skins. Longer, larger cucumbers such as Marketmore and Bush Champion are best for fresh eating, not pickling.
For the best pickles, choose cucumbers that are free of blemishes and undamaged. Cucumbers prime for pickling are harvested not more than 24 hours in advance. If you hold off pickling for more than a day, your pickles will become hollow in the center during processing.
Just ripe cucumbers are best. If your cucumbers are very firm or not ripe, you will want to cook them longer so that the brine can permeate the centers. (Pickles that float to the top of the jar have not been fully cooked.)
A note on vinegar used in pickling: white vinegar will result in lighter colored pickles; cider vinegar or herb-flavored vinegar will yield a richer flavor but will darken the pickles.
A note on dill and spices: fresh dill and spices will give your pickles the best flavor; ground spices and old spices will impart a dusty flavor.
This recipe will make 5 quarts.
Ingredients
  • Make 5 quarts
  • 5½ cups water
  • 3½ cups white or champagne vinegar
  • 2 tablespoons pickling or kosher salt
  • 1 tablespoon sugar for tart pickles; 2 tablespoons of sugar for a sweeter pickle
  • 5 teaspoons dill seeds
  • 10 dill sprigs
  • 5 garlic cloves
  • 25 pickling cucumbers blossom end trimmed (each cuke about 4 inches long)

Directions to Make Dill Pickles:

1. Rinse cucumbers thoroughly under running water to remove any dirt and drain. Trim the stem to about ⅛ to ¼ inch and slice away the blossom end of each cucumber (trimming the blossom end will keep the cucumbers from going soft). Each cucumber should be about 1 inch shorter than the canning jar. If you like, quarter each cuke lengthwise for dill spears or cut crosswise into ¼–inch rounds for hamburger pickles.
2. Using dill seeds: Toast the seeds until fragrant in a dry sauté pan over medium heat, about 1 minute; you will want 1 teaspoon of dill seeds for each quart.
Using fresh dill florets: Snip dill florets from plants leaving the stems just long enough to fit into each jar. You’ll need 2 or 3 florets per quart jar.
3. Scald the canning jars in a pot of boiling water. It’s easiest if you use a pot fitted with a jar rack. Soak the lids in hot water to soften the rubber seals.
4. Add 1 teaspoon of dill seeds or 2 or 3 sprigs of dill to each quart jar before adding cucumbers. Spice these pickles up by adding 1 clove of garlic to each jar and 2 allspice berries to each jar. (You can parblanch the garlic in advance—meaning to place the cloves in a saucepan of water and bring to a boil for 2 minutes–to bring out the full flavor.)
5. Pack 5 cucumbers loosely into the hot, sterilized quart jars.
6. In a large stainless steel pot or nonstick saucepan combine water, vinegar, pickling salt, and sugar. Bring the mix to a boil over high heat, stirring constantly, until sugar and salt are dissolved. Reduce heat and simmer gently, stirring occasionally for 15 minutes until the brine is ready.
Sweet and spicy dill pickles option: Use cider vinegar instead of white vinegar; add 2 hot chile peppers, seeded and minced to the to vinegar mixture. When adding dill to each jar also add to each jar ½ tablespoon mustard seeds, 1 bay leaf, ½ tablespoon black peppercorns, and 1 clove garlic halved.
7. Pour or ladle the hot brine over the cucumbers leaving a bit less than ½ inch headspace from the rim of the jar. (You can transfer the brine to a heat-proof pitcher to pour over the cucumbers if that will make it easier.) Run a thin non-metallic utensil around the inside of the jar checking for air pockets and allowing air to escape; add more brine if necessary.
8. Wipe the jar rims with a clean towel, set the lid in place then screw on the metal ring until snug not tight.
9. Return the jars to the rack and place the jars in the hot water pot (bath) and add enough water to cover the jars by about 1 inch. Bring the water to a boil and process the jars for 30 minutes (start the timer when the water reaches a boil). After turn off the heat and leave the jars in the water for a few minutes.
10. Remove the jars from the water and let cool completely on the rack or a folded kitchen towel.
11. Check the seals, label the jars. Store the jars in a cool place. The pickles will keep for up to 1 year.
Allow about 1 week before optimal pickle flavors develop.

Monday, July 22, 2013

DIY dishwasher tablets
















DIY dishwasher tablets.....Mix together 2 cups of borax, 1/2 cup of Epsom salts, 2 cups of bi-carb soda, half a cup of vinegar and a good squirt of lemon juice. Poor into an ice cube tray and wait for it to set in the sun for 24 hours.

Thursday, July 18, 2013

crutches as shelves

How To Detail Your Car

http://www.popularmechanics.com/cars/how-to/repair/1272211

What to plant and when


January


It's time for garden catalogs to arrive in the mail. January is a great time to start planning what you will be planting in your garden. Look through your catalogs and find the vegetable seeds for your garden. Some flower varieties should be started in January. In a warmer environment you can plant certain vegetables but must be ready for a frost. Indoor herbs are always great to grow in a sunny windowsill.

Tomatoes and Peppers
Get a head start on the growing season by starting your tomato and pepper seeds indoors. Most tomatoes and peppers will take 6-8 weeks to reach transplant size so plan according to your climate zone!
Suggested tomato variety: BrandywineCherokee PurpleRomaSweetieHeirloom Blend
Suggested pepper variety: California WonderEarly JalapenoSweet BananaSuper Chili

OnionsLate January is a great time to start your onion seeds indoors if you live in a warmer gardening zone (6-10) For zones 1-5 start your onion seeds in mid-late February. Let the onions grow to 5-6 inches tall and cut tops off so they will be only 3 inches. Repeating this until they are transplanted helps strengthen the roots and health of the onions.
Suggested onion varieties: Sweet White Walla WallaCandy HybridYellow Sweet SpanishNebuka Evergreen

HerbsHerbs are defiantly the most popular indoor plant to grow throughout the winter months. Try your hand at these 5 most popular herbs. Also check out the Urban Farmer Herb Kit
Suggested variety: BasilChivesOreganoParsleyThyme

Annual and Perennial Flowers
Now is a great time to get your spring flowers germinating and ready for spring! There are many different varieties of annuals and perennials with different grow times. Pay attention to grow times so that your flowers are ready to be planted after last frost. Below are some good varieties to start in January for a last frost in March and April!
Annuals: ZinnasMarigoldsGeraniums
Perennials: RudbeckiasDaisiesPoppiesConeflowers


February


Get your garden planning started. In some warmer locations you can begin sowing your vegetable seeds outdoors. For cooler areas, February is a great time to sow your tomatoes and peppers. Start drawing out your garden for all the vegetables you want to grow. In late February there are several cool weather vegetables you can directly sow out in the garden. February is a great time to try a Garden Shot!

Broccoli 
If you live in a warmer climate and can find a quick growing Broccoli variety you can harvest until it bolts in the hot summer sun! 
Suggested variety: Calabrese

Herbs:
Plant heat loving herbs like basil, oregano, thyme and sage. 
Suggested varieties: Italian BasilGreek OreganoDill

Lettuce 
Start a crop of salad mix greens that gets bright sun but not all day. Great for spring crops until the lettuce begins to bolt in the summer sun.
Suggested Varieties: ButtercrunchMesclun MixBlack Seeded Simpson

OnionsGet those onion seeds growing. Be careful to select an onion variety appropriate for your garden zone. Northern areas should plant long day onions. Southern regions should plant short day onions.
Suggest variety: Sweet White WallaRed CreolYellow Spanish

Tomatoes and Peppers
Get a head start on the growing season by starting your tomato and pepper seeds indoors. Most tomatoes and peppers will take 6-8 weeks to reach transplant size so plan according to your climate zone!

Peppers

Fresh, crisp peppers are a garden favorite. Peppers take up little space and can produce high yields when planted close together. Plant as many different varieties as possible. They come small, big, hot, mild, and an array of different colors. Start seeds indoors for best results.
Suggested variety: California WonderEarly JalapenoSweet BananaSuper Chili

Tomatoes
The most popular garden vegetable. Growing tomatoes is not only fun but treats you to some of the best tasting fruits in the world. Tomatoes come in many colors, shapes, taste, and sizes. Grow a few varieties every year to find your favorites! Start seeds indoors for best results.
Suggested variety: BrandywineCherokee PurpleRomaSweetieHeirloom Blend


March


March is the perfect time to get those tomato and pepper seeds started indoors ready for an early spring planting! Also a great time to start planting those cool weather vegetables that can withstand those last frost days of March and April. A great time to try a Garden Shot!

Beets
Sow beets now for a fast, early summer treat.
Suggested variety: Detroit Dark Red
Broccoli 
If you live in a warmer climate and can find a quick growing Broccoli variety you can harvest until it bolts in the hot summer sun! 
Suggested variety: Calabrese

Cabbage
Cabbage is one of the easier plants to grow in the garden. Select a variety that is right for your location (size and maturity length). Be sure to fertilize and water when cabbage head begins to form. 
Suggested variety: Premium Late Flat DutchGolden AcreMichihili

Carrots 
Planting carrots by mid-July yields a fall crop that will keep in the garden until used. 
Suggested variety: Little FingerScarlet Nantes

Corn
One of the most rewarding and fast growing crops to grow. Corn is delicious when cooked only minutes after being pulled off the stalk. Try a small plot of corn, working your way to a large field of several varieties. 
Suggested variety: Peaches and CreamIncredibleSugar Buns

Cucumbers
Fast growing vine or bush cucumber plants can produce an abundance of cucumber fruits. Be careful to pick a variety for the space you have in your garden. Vine cucumbers can be the best tasting but need far more space than bush varieties.
Suggest variety: Spacemaster 80MuncherMarketmore 76

Herbs:
Plant heat loving herbs like basil, oregano, thyme and sage. 
Suggested varieties: Italian BasilGreek OreganoDill

Lettuce 
Start a crop of salad mix greens that gets bright sun but not all day. Great for late summer and early fall crops.
Suggested Varieties: ButtercrunchMesclun MixBlack Seeded Simpson

Melons
Melons are some of the most rewarding plants to grow. Great for hot, long summers. A staple for summer picnics and family fun.
Suggested variety: Sugar BabyCrimson SweetHales Best

Onions
Get those onion seeds growing. Be careful to select an onion variety appropriate for your garden zone. Northern areas should plant long day onions. Southern regions should plant short day onions.
Suggest variety: Sweet White WallaRed CreolYellow Spanish

Peas 

Green peas and sugar peas are good to plant in July, and will produce a moderate fall harvest.
Suggested variety: Sugar AnnOregon Giant

Peppers
Fresh, crisp peppers are a garden favorite. Peppers take up little space and can produce high yields when planted close together. Plant as many different varieties as possible. They come small, big, hot, mild, and an array of different colors.
Suggested variety: California WonderEarly JalapenoSweet BananaSuper Chili

Spinach 
Spinach is more of a cool weather vegetable and will produce until hot weather of summer. Planting in early March will ensure you have plenty of harvest before bolting.
Suggested variety: BloomsdaleSamish

Summer Squash
Yum! Summer squash sowing in June will lead to fresh squash and zucchini in July and August.
Suggested Varieties: CocozelleWaltham Butternut

Tomatoes
The most popular garden vegetable. Growing tomatoes is not only fun but treats you to some of the best tasting fruits in the world. Tomatoes come in many colors, shapes, taste, and sizes. Grow a few varieties every year to find your favorites!
Suggested variety: BrandywineCherokee PurpleRomaSweetieHeirloom Blend


April


Yes, Yes, Yes! April is finally here and your garden soil is finally warming up! April is the best time to plant most of your vegetable seeds after your last frost. It's still not too late to plant tomatoes and peppers from seeds as well. Check out the below vegetables that can be started in April. Be sure to check your gardening zone for last frost dates. Try a Salsa Garden this spring!

Beans:
Start planting both bush and pole beans now that the soil and air are warmed up. Try a continual 7-10 day sowing of different varieties. This will give you continual bean crops and not one large harvest with wasted crop.
Suggested variety: ContenderKentucky WonderTopcrop

Beets
Sow beets now for a fast, early summer treat.
Suggested Varieties: Detroit Dark Red
Cabbage
Cabbage is one of the easier plants to grow in the garden. Select a variety that is right for your location (size and maturity length). Be sure to fertilize and water when cabbage head begins to form. 
Suggested variety: Premium Late Flat DutchGolden AcreMichihili

Carrots 
Planting carrots by April will give an early summer crop. 
Suggested variety: Little FingerScarlet Nantes

Corn
One of the most rewarding and fast growing crops to grow. Corn is delicious when cooked only minutes after being pulled off the stalk. Try a small plot of corn, working your way to a large field of several varieties. 
Suggested variety: Peaches and CreamIncredibleSugar Buns

Cucumbers
Fast growing vine or bush cucumber plants can produce an abundance of cucumber fruits. Be careful to pick a variety for the space you have in your garden. Vine cucumbers can be the best tasting but need far more space than bush varieties.
Suggest variety: Spacemaster 80MuncherMarketmore 76

Herbs:
Plant heat loving herbs like basil, oregano, thyme and sage. 
Suggested varieties: Italian BasilGreek OreganoDill

Lettuce 
Start a crop of salad mix greens that gets bright sun but not all day. Great for late summer and early fall crops.
Suggested Varieties: ButtercrunchMesclun MixBlack Seeded Simpson

Melons
Melons are some of the most rewarding plants to grow. Great for hot, long summers. A staple for summer picnics and family fun.
Suggested variety: Sugar BabyCrimson SweetHales Best

Onions
Get those onion seeds growing. Be careful to select an onion variety appropriate for your garden zone. Northern areas should plant long day onions. Southern regions should plant short day onions.
Suggest variety: Sweet White WallaRed CreolYellow Spanish

Peas 

Green peas and sugar peas are good to plant in April, and will produce a May crop.
Suggested variety: Sugar AnnOregon Giant

Peppers
Fresh, crisp peppers are a garden favorite. Peppers take up little space and can produce high yields when planted close together. Plant as many different varieties as possible. They come small, big, hot, mild, and an array of different colors.
Suggested variety: California WonderEarly JalapenoSweet BananaSuper Chili

Summer Squash
Yum! Summer squash sowing in June will lead to fresh squash and zucchini in July and August.
Suggested Varieties: CocozelleWaltham Butternut

Tomatoes
The most popular garden vegetable. Growing tomatoes is not only fun but treats you to some of the best tasting fruits in the world. Tomatoes come in many colors, shapes, taste, and sizes. Grow a few varieties every year to find your favorites!
Suggested variety: BrandywineCherokee PurpleRomaSweetieHeirloom Blend


May


Finally warm temperatures are here to stay and you don't have to worry about that frost. You may think it's too late to grow all your favorite vegetables from seed but warm May temperatures have made the soil perfect for sowing seeds. Warm soil will allow for fast germination and growing plants. Good choices are summertime kitchen garden staples like squash, beans, cucumbers and melons.

Beans:
Start planting both bush and pole beans now that the soil and air are warmed up. Try a continual 7-10 day sowing of different varieties. This will give you continual bean crops and not one large harvest with wasted crop.
Suggested variety: ContenderKentucky WonderTopcrop

Beets
Sow beets now for a fast, early summer treat.
Suggested Varieties: Detroit Dark Red
Cabbage
Cabbage is one of the easier plants to grow in the garden. Select a variety that is right for your location (size and maturity length). Be sure to fertilize and water when cabbage head begins to form. 
Suggested variety: Premium Late Flat DutchGolden AcreMichihili

Carrots 
Planting carrots by mid-July yields a fall crop that will keep in the garden until used. 
Suggested variety: Little FingerScarlet Nantes

Corn
One of the most rewarding and fast growing crops to grow. Corn is delicious when cooked only minutes after being pulled off the stalk. Try a small plot of corn, working your way to a large field of several varieties. 
Suggested variety: Peaches and CreamIncredibleSugar Buns

Cucumbers
Fast growing vine or bush cucumber plants can produce an abundance of cucumber fruits. Be careful to pick a variety for the space you have in your garden. Vine cucumbers can be the best tasting but need far more space than bush varieties.
Suggest variety: Spacemaster 80MuncherMarketmore 76

Herbs:
Plant heat loving herbs like basil, oregano, thyme and sage. 
Suggested varieties: Italian BasilGreek OreganoDill

Melons
Melons are some of the most rewarding plants to grow. Great for hot, long summers. A staple for summer picnics and family fun.
Suggested variety: Sugar BabyCrimson SweetHales Best

Peppers
Fresh, crisp peppers are a garden favorite. Peppers take up little space and can produce high yields when planted close together. Plant as many different varieties as possible. They come small, big, hot, mild, and an array of different colors. Start seeds indoors for best results.
Suggested variety: California WonderEarly JalapenoSweet BananaSuper Chili

Summer Squash
Yum! Summer squash sowing in June will lead to fresh squash and zucchini in July and August.
Suggested Varieties: CocozelleWaltham Butternut

Tomatoes
The most popular garden vegetable. Growing tomatoes is not only fun but treats you to some of the best tasting fruits in the world. Tomatoes come in many colors, shapes, taste, and sizes. Grow a few varieties every year to find your favorites! You may want to think about buy transplants in May.
Suggested variety: BrandywineCherokee PurpleRomaSweetieHeirloom Blend


June


Most fruiting plants like tomatoes, peppers, and eggplants should already be in the ground. Many vegetables though will grow and produce even more quickly from seed planted in early summer when the soil is well warmed up and teeming with life. 

Beans:
Beans are great for a June planting. Fast growing in warm soil will give you a crop in as little as 35 days with some varieties.
Suggested variety: ContenderKentucky WonderTopcrop

Beets
Sow beets now for a fast, mid-summer treat.
Suggested Varieties: Detroit Dark Red
Cabbage
Cabbage is one of the easier plants to grow in the garden. Select a variety that is right for your location (size and maturity length). Be sure to fertilize and water when cabbage head begins to form. 
Suggested variety: Premium Late Flat DutchGolden AcreMichihili

Carrots 
Planting carrots by mid-June yields a late summer crop that will keep in the garden until used. 
Suggested variety: Little FingerScarlet Nantes

Corn
One of the most rewarding and fast growing crops to grow. Corn is delicious when cooked only minutes after being pulled off the stalk. Try a small plot of corn, working your way to a large field of several varieties. 
Suggested variety: Peaches and CreamIncredibleSugar Buns

Cucumbers
Fast growing vine or bush cucumber plants can produce an abundance of cucumber fruits. Be careful to pick a variety for the space you have in your garden. Vine cucumbers can be the best tasting but need far more space than bush varieties.
Suggest variety: Spacemaster 80MuncherMarketmore 76

Herbs:
Plant heat loving herbs like basil, oregano, thyme and sage. 
Suggested varieties: Italian BasilGreek OreganoDill

Melons
Melons are some of the most rewarding plants to grow. Great for hot, long summers. A staple for summer picnics and family fun.
Suggested variety: Sugar BabyCrimson SweetHales Best

Peas 
Green peas and sugar peas are good to plant in July, and will produce a great summer crop of fresh, crisp peas.
Suggested variety: Sugar AnnOregon Giant

Summer Squash
Yum! Summer squash sowing in June will lead to fresh squash and zucchini in July and August.
Suggested Varieties: CocozelleWaltham Butternut


July

There are still some great crops that can be planted that will keep your garden pumping out vegetables well into the fall.

Beans:
Start planting both bush and pole beans now that the soil and air are warmed up. Try a continual 7-10 day sowing of different varieties. This will give you continual bean crops and not one large harvest with wasted crop.
Suggested variety: ContenderKentucky WonderTopcrop

Broccoli 
Broccoli can be planted in the fall to produce a crop well into November. 
Suggested variety: Calabrese

Carrots 
Planting carrots by mid-July yields a fall crop that will keep in the garden until used. 
Suggested variety: Scarlet Nantes

Corn
One of the most rewarding and fast growing crops to grow. Corn is delicious when cooked only minutes after being pulled off the stalk. Try a small plot of corn, working your way to a large field of several varieties. Last practical date to plant any corn variety is the first week in July. Must plant an early maturing corn variety.
Suggested varietyBodaciousSugar BunsEarly Golden Bantam

Cucumbers
Fast growing vine or bush cucumber plants can produce an abundance of cucumber fruits. Be careful to pick a variety for the space you have in your garden. Vine cucumbers can be the best tasting but need far more space than bush varieties.
Suggest variety: Spacemaster 80MuncherMarketmore 76

Kale 
Planting kale mid-July through mid-August will yield an excellent harvest in the fall and winter. 
Suggested variety: Dwarf Blue


August

August is an ideal time to plant seeds for a second gardening season that can be as productive as your major early spring plantings. Late summer is the time to plant these vegetables and herbs.

Beans:
Start planting both bush and pole beans now that the soil and air are warmed up. Try a continual 7-10 day sowing of different varieties. This will give you continual bean crops and not one large harvest with wasted crop. Early August is the last practical sowing date.
Suggested variety: ContenderKentucky WonderTopcrop

Cucumbers
Fast growing vine or bush cucumber plants can produce an abundance of cucumber fruits. Be careful to pick a variety for the space you have in your garden. Vine cucumbers can be the best tasting but need far more space than bush varieties.
Suggest variety: Spacemaster 80MuncherMarketmore 76

Flower BulbsAugust is a great time to plant those fall flower bulbs. There are many varieties that can be planted this fall and start blooming early spring. Flower Bulbs

Kale 
Planting kale mid-July through mid-August will yield an excellent harvest in the fall and winter. 
Suggested variety: Dwarf Blue

Lettuce 
Sow lettuce in August for a fall crop. Try growing early harvest varieties that will produce a harvest before cold weather rolls in.
Suggested Varieties: ButtercrunchSalad Bowl

Peas 
Green peas and sugar peas are good to plant in August, and will produce a moderate fall harvest.
Suggested variety: Sugar Ann

Radish
A quick and easy vegetable to grow. Plant now and you can have them ready in 30 days.
Suggested variety: Cherry Belle

Spinach 
Spinach is more of a cool weather vegetable and is great to grow in August.
Suggested variety: BloomsdaleSamish


September

Although September marks the beginning of fall, there are still a few fast growing vegetables that can be planted this month and be harvested before the first frost in most gardening zones. Remember to keep your soil warm by removing all mulch and maybe try using a plastic sheet to trap heat into the soil. Try these vegetables below and you can still take advantage of your garden this fall.

BlueberriesFall is the perfect time to plant blueberry plants. Planting in the fall will allow for good root growth and early growth this coming spring.
Suggested variety: Blueberry Bluecrop

Broccoli 
If you live in a warmer climate and can find a quick growing Broccoli variety you can harvest well into November. 
Suggested variety: Calabrese

Flower BulbsSeptember is a great time to plant those fall flower bulbs. There are many varieties that can be planted this fall and start blooming early spring. Flower Bulbs

Garlic

Garlic is a vegetable that can be planted in the fall for a larger and earlier harvest this coming spring.
Suggested variety: Italian Garlic

Lettuce 

Sow lettuce late summer for a fall crop. Grow fast maturing varieties.
Suggested Varieties: Buttercrunch
Radish
A quick and easy vegetable to grow. Plant now and you can have them ready in 30 days.
Suggested variety: Cherry Belle

Spinach 
Spinach is more of a cool weather vegetable and is great to grow in September.
Suggested variety: BloomsdaleOlympia HybridSamish


October

Fall is here and many vegetables don't have enough time to develop before your first frost. There are still a few vegetables that can be planted in October.

BlueberriesFall is the perfect time to plant blueberry plants. Planting in the fall will allow for good root growth and early growth this coming spring.
Suggested variety: Blueberry Bluecrop

Flower BulbsOctober is a great time to plant those fall flower bulbs. There are many varieties that can be planted this fall and start blooming early spring. Flower Bulbs

Garlic
Garlic is a vegetable that can be planted in the fall for a larger and earlier harvest this coming spring.
Suggested variety: Italian Garlic

HerbsHerbs are defiantly the most popular indoor plant to grow throughout the winter months. Try your hand at these 5 most popular herbs. Also check out the Urban Farmer Herb Kit
Suggested variety: BasilChivesOreganoParsleyThyme


November

Don't be sad, you can still grow a lot of different plants inside. This is a great time of the year to clone some of your outside plants or grow them from seed indoors. Grow herbs on the windowsill!

HerbsHerbs are defiantly the most popular indoor plant to grow throughout the winter months. Try your hand at these 5 most popular herbs. Also check out the Urban Farmer Herb Kit
Suggested variety: BasilChivesOreganoParsleyThyme

Indoor Plants
Growing flowers indoors can be a good way to pass the winter months. Try growing an indoor Amaryllis flower kit. These beautiful flowers will brighten up your house and give off a nice aroma.
Suggest: Seasonal Decorations

Vegetables
If you live in some warmer climates it is a perfect time to plant vegetables. Try some of the cool weather vegetables that can survive now that the summer heat is over.
Suggest variety: LettuceRadishSpinachBroccoliCarrots


December

It's time for the garden seed catalogs to arrive! Start planning your garden wherever you live. Try growing some fresh herbs inside on your kitchen windowsill.

HerbsHerbs are defiantly the most popular indoor plant to grow throughout the winter months. Try your hand at these 5 most popular herbs. Also check out the Urban Farmer Herb Kit
Suggested variety: BasilChivesOreganoParsleyThyme

Vegetables
If you live in some warmer climates it is a perfect time to plant vegetables. Try some of the cool weather vegetables that can survive now that the summer heat is over.
Suggest variety: LettuceRadishSpinachBroccoliCarrots