Tuesday, April 30, 2013

propagating basil

Dr Pepper Cake


DR. PEPPER CAKE

1 box yellow cake mix
1 box instant vanilla pudding
4 eggs
3/4 cup oil
1 10 oz. can of Dr. pepper
3/4 cups walnuts (Chopped)
Glaze: 1 cup powdered sugar and 1 tsp vanilla and enough Dr. pepper to make a thin glaze.

How to make it

Turn oven to 350 degrees.
Grease a bundt pan.
Mix all ingredients together and pour into bundt pan.
Bake for one hour.
After cake cools , pour glaze over the top. Cut and serve.

Pallet Ideas












Chicken Enchilada Dip Roll-Ups


  • I have made Enjoy everyone!!!

Chicken Enchilada Dip Roll-Ups
Ingredients:
2 - 8 oz. packages cream cheese, softened
1 1/3 cup shredded Mexican blend cheese
1 teaspoon garlic, finely minced (I used my garlic press)
1 1/2 Tablespoon chili powder
1 teaspoon cumin
Cayenne pepper to taste
Salt to taste
1 Rotisserie chicken, skinned and shredded - If you can find a southwest flavored chicken, that would be even better.
1/2 bunch cilantro, chopped
4 green onions, chopped
10 oz. can Rotel tomatoes
1 package jalapeno cheddar tortillas

Directions:
Mix cheeses together until well blended.
Add all remaining ingredients and mix well.
Cover and refrigerate for at least one hour.
Place one heaping spoonful onto tortilla.
Spread to edges using a metal spatula.
Roll and cut into slices.

    Chicken Enchilada Dip Roll-Ups
    Ingredients:
    2 - 8 oz. packages cream cheese, softened
    ... 1 1/3 cup shredded Mexican blend cheese
    1 teaspoon garlic, finely minced (I used my garlic press)
    1 1/2 Tablespoon chili powder
    1 teaspoon cumin
    Cayenne pepper to taste
    Salt to taste
    1 Rotisserie chicken, skinned and shredded - If you can find a southwest flavored chicken, that would be even better.
    1/2 bunch cilantro, chopped
    4 green onions, chopped
    10 oz. can Rotel tomatoes
    1 package jalapeno cheddar tortillas

    Directions:
    Mix cheeses together until well blended.
    Add all remaining ingredients and mix well.
    Cover and refrigerate for at least one hour.
    Place one heaping spoonful onto tortilla.
    Spread to edges using a metal spatula.
    Roll and cut into slices.

Monday, April 29, 2013

DIY Dry Shampoo

t-shirt remake

Cleaning Closet Organization


Shoe Organizer Cleaning Supplies
If you’re a fan of Real Simple you know we love storing things other than shoes in a hanging shoe organizer. Those pockets are perfectly sized for so many things, including cleaning supplies!
Here’s the trick for making it work in your utility closet, garage, basement or laundry room: you can actually cut a fabric shoe organizer in half to make it fit your space. And it’s easy to add a couple of nails, or a sturdy curtain rod to hang the organizer on depending on what you have available.
Just remember to store anything with a high leak potential toward the bottom of the organizer, and anything that needs to be kept out of little hands’ reach on the top row.
Want more organizing tips? Check out our complete guide to organizing your utility closet and our month-by-month guide to organizing.

Crunch Challenge

Pallet Office

Soap Making 101 – Making Cold Process Soap


Soap Making 101 – Making Cold Process Soap

Soap Making 101 - Cold Process Soap

While there are other methods of making soap (hot process and melt & pour), this tutorial will cover how to make your own all natural cold process soaps. This post will be added to the Soapmaking page on my blog along with other helpful links and recipes, so be sure to bookmark or pin it for easy reference.
Making soap is one of my favorite hobbies. There are so many ways to personalize a single recipe, that I rarely make the same soap twice! Once you get the hang of it, you will never want to go back to store-bought again!
A few things to note, before we start:
  • Making soap is not the most frugal activity out there. I like to use top-grade, organic ingredients, so I spend about $3.00 and up, per bar, and and that’s not including the cost of packaging. You can certainly use cheaper ingredients (in fact, I suggest you do so for your first learning batch), but if you want free or almost free soap, check out Money Saving Mom. I still have stacks of Ivory soap that I got for FREE using her grocery shopping deals and tips!
  • Many people are afraid to make soap because it involves handling lye. I know that feeling, because I was the same way! I had my husband do that part at first. Lye requires a huge amount of caution. You need to employ the same common sense you’d use for any potentially dangerous situation such as cooking with a hot stove, or driving down the road in your car.Handle the lye with proper protective gloves and eye wear along with a healthy dose of respect. Do NOT involve your children in this activity. There are other fun ways they can “make” herbal soap, that I will cover in another post, another day.
  • This is just an overview. There are many tutorials and books out there that cover soap making. I have some listed on mySoapmaking Page and a Google search will help you find others. It’s prudent to do your research and view the art from many perspectives before attempting.
  • Many of my recipes contain palm oil. I am aware of the environmental concerns surrounding this product and only buy certified sustainably farmed types from Mountain Rose Herbsand am working on recipes that don’t use it at all. If you’re unable to purchase ecologically sound palm oil, please choose a recipe that does not use it. Check out the links on theSoapmaking page for a few ideas.
  • An accurate digital scale is essential! I used this one from Amazon.com for five years before it broke (and by that, I mean it stopped measuring in anything but grams – which is still usable, but not always useful for my various projects.) I bought a replacement at Walmart that also works great.
Okay! Now, we’re ready to start! You’ll want to do the following things:

MMS violet soap screen shot
  • (1.) Choose a recipe and run it through a lye calculator, especially if you decide to make changes to it. Each type of oil requires a different amount of lye to saponify (turn into soap.) So, if you’re out of the castor oil called for in a recipe and want to use shea butter instead, you’re going to need a different amount of lye or your soap will end up too harsh or too soft. I like to use the Majestic Mountain Sage Lye Calculator.  Just plug your recipe into the blanks and calculate the lye needed. If you click the screenshot above, you’ll see it gives a range of liquid to use and a range of lye. I use around the 6 for lye and a midway point for the water/liquid (about 15 ounces in the example above.)

Soap Making Ingredients
  • (2.) Assemble your ingredients and safety gear. Lye is sometimes hard to find; my local Tractor Supply store carries two containers at a time and I found a small, local Mom & Pop type hardware store that has a few as well. Make sure the bottle says Sodium Hydroxide and nothing else. You may have to order online. If so, here are two sources: Brushy Mountain Bee Farmand Bramble Berry. I buy my oils & butters from Mountain Rose Herbs, but you can also check your local grocery and health food stores. Don’t forget you’ll need heat & chemical proof gloves and safety goggles along with a kitchen or candy thermometer (a separate one used strictly for soap and not food use.)

Prepare Molds
  • (3.) Prepare your molds by lining with parchment paper. I have homemade wooden box molds that my dad and brother made for me, but you can also buy them from several places online such as Bramble Berry. I’ve even seen people use rubbermaid containers or heavy duty cardboard boxes. A quick google search will likely give you plenty of inspiration!

Measure Water for Soap
  • (4.) Now, we start measuring stuff. First, you’ll want to measure out your water into a heat proof tempered glass jar, pyrex measuring cup, stainless steel or heavy duty polypropylene plastic (recycle symbol 5) container. [NOTE: I've been told that glass/pyrex can weaken over time and shatter, so to be absolutely safe, use one of the alternatives.] All soap ingredients should be weighed with a digital scale, this includes your liquids. This picture shows me measuring water for a recipe that called for 20 to 31 ounces of liquid. I decided on a mid-range of 26 oz. You can see I went over .3 ounces. This is okay for liquids, but not okay for oils and most definitely not okay for lye. Those need to be precise. More liquid means your soap takes a bit longer to set up (useful if you’re adding honey or beeswax or other items that speed up things) and less liquid means it sets up and is ready to pour into molds faster.

Measure Lye for Soap Making
  • (5.) Next, measure out your lye. (Make sure you have on those gloves and goggles!) I use an old plastic cup, labeled “Lye” in several places all over with a Sharpie. I pour slowly and carefully then immediately re-cap the lye container and place it far from the reach of children and pets. I take a wet paper towel and thoroughly wipe down the scale and surrounding area in case a tiny grain got loose.  Then I do it again with a fresh paper towel. This may seem over-kill to some experienced soap makers, but I have kids and pets and just one tiny grain accidentally picked up and rubbed into an eye or eaten wouldn’t be cool. I’d rather take a few minutes to be safe now than sorry later.

Pour Lye Into Water
  • (6.) Pour the lye into the water (or other liquid.) I do this in my kitchen sink in order to catch any splashes or drips and just in case I have a “volcano.” This only happened to me once because I tried to pour my lye into a very hot herbal tea. I should have been patient and waited for it to cool first, but did not and had to start all over. So, make sure you pour the lye into water that is cool or no warmer than room temp. Also, you always add the lye to the liquid and not the other way around (the other cause of lye volcanoes.) This mixture shoots up to over 200 degrees F quickly, so use caution when handling. Avoid directly breathing in the fumes. (I keep the window over my kitchen sink opened during this step.) Stir with a long wooden spoon or rubber spatula until fully dissolved and set in a safe place, out of reach of children and pets, until it cools to about 90 to 125 degrees.

Measure Oils and Butters
  • (7.) While the lye solution is cooling, weigh out the oils and butters called for in your recipe. Place these in an enamel or stainless steel pot, that you plan to use for soap making only. (Do not use aluminum during any stage of the soap making process.) Turn the heat on low and gently heat the oils until they reach 90-125 degrees F.

Pour Lye into Oils
  • (8.) Before mixing, make sure your lye and oils are roughly the same temperature in the range of 90 – 125 degrees F. I sometimes add an ice cube or two to my lye solution to cool it faster (remember the water amount can be adjusted by this small amount) or set my pan of oil down into a sink filled with a few inches of water and ice cubes if it needs cooling. Temperature is a subjective, personal preference that varies between soap-makers. Some will only mix at higher temperatures than I list while others let everything sit overnight and mix the next morning at room temperature. The main thing is that your lye solution and oils are about the same temperature when you mix them. Once the desired temps are reached, slowly drizzle your lye solution into your pot containing oils and butters.

Blend until Trace is reached
  • (9.) Using a stick blender, start combining the lye solution and oils, stopping to occasionally stir and check consistency. It only takes a few minutes for most of my recipes to reach “trace” – which means when you drizzle a small bit of the soap mixture over the surface, it will leave a faint pattern or trace before sinking back into the mixture. (Click on the picture above, which demonstrates this.) My first several batches of soap were made without using a stick blender. Every single one failed. I highly highly HIGHLY recommend using one. I have one by Cuisinart that I’ve had for many years. Make sure you use it strictly for soap making and not for food use. Once trace is reached, you’ll add any extras such as honey, oatmeal, natural colorants, and essential oils and blend for just a bit more until they are all incorporated.

Quickly pour soap into molds
  • (10.) Working quickly, pour the soap into your prepared molds, smoothing the top with a rubber spatula or wooden spoon. Pick up your mold and give it a few sharp raps on the table or counter surface to help get rid of any little air bubbles that may have formed.

Cover soap and don't disturb for 24 hours
  • (11.) Cover with the mold top, then several layers of blankets and quilts to make sure the soap is well insulated and retains the heat needed to finish saponifying. Leave undisturbed for about 24 to 36 hours.

Cutting Cold Process Soap
  • (12.) Unmold your block of soap. You can cut it into bars right away or later. I like to do it fairly soon after making, so that the soap is still soft and easy to cut. Use a ruler and a knife to cut into desired sizes. Let the bars cure in the open air on pieces of wax paper or brown paper, turning occasionally, for about 4 weeks. Since I almost always superfat my soaps, (which means I put in extra oils that the lye does not transform to soap), they are gentle enough to start testing after three weeks. I always test on myself a few days before trying out on other family members, just to be safe.

Create Custom Soaps From A Single Recipe
This wraps up my post on the basics of soap making. Remember, this is just an overview! Be sure to check out the links and books on mySoapmaking Page so you can research more thoroughly before you make your first batch. Next time, I’ll write about how you can create custom soaps from a single recipe. Over the next few weeks, I’ll share some of my favorite soap recipes from The Nerdy Farm Wife Shop too!

Pecan Pie Cobbler


Pecan Pie Cobbler

1 box refrigerated pie crusts, softened as directed on box (or see recipe for homemade pie crust)
2 1/2 cups light corn syrup
2 1/2 cups packed brown sugar
1/2 cup butter, melted
4 ½ teaspoons vanilla
6 eggs, slightly beaten
2 cups coarsely chopped pecans
Butter-flavor cooking spray
2 cups pecan halves
Vanilla ice cream, if desired

Heat oven to 425°F. Grease 13x9- inch (3-quart) glass baking dish with shortening or cooking spray. Remove 1 pie crust from pouch; unroll on work surface. Roll into 13x9-inch rectangle; trim sides to fit baking dish. Place crust in dish.

In large bowl, stir corn syrup, brown sugar, butter, vanilla and eggs with wire whisk. Stir in chopped pecans. Spoon half of filling into pastry-lined dish.

Remove second pie crust from pouch; unroll on work surface. Roll into 13x9-inch rectangle; trim sides to fit baking dish. Place crust over filling. Spray crust with cooking spray.

Bake 14 to 16 minutes or until browned. Reduce oven temperature to 350°F.

Carefully spoon remaining filling over baked pastry; arrange pecan halves on top in decorative fashion.

Bake 30 minutes longer or until set. Cool 20 minutes on cooling rack. Serve warm cobbler with vanilla ice cream.
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1 box refrigerated pie crusts, softened as directed on box (or see recipe for homemade pie crust)
2 1/2 cups light corn syrup
2 1/2 cups packed brown sugar
1/2 cup butter, melted
4 ½ teaspoons vanilla
6 eggs, slightly beaten
2 cups coarsely chopped pecans
Butter-flavor cooking spray
2 cups pecan halves
Vanilla ice cream, if desired

Heat oven to 425°F. Grease 13x9- inch (3-quart) glass baking dish with shortening or cooking spray. Remove 1 pie crust from pouch; unroll on work surface. Roll into 13x9-inch rectangle; trim sides to fit baking dish. Place crust in dish.

In large bowl, stir corn syrup, brown sugar, butter, vanilla and eggs with wire whisk. Stir in chopped pecans. Spoon half of filling into pastry-lined dish.

Remove second pie crust from pouch; unroll on work surface. Roll into 13x9-inch rectangle; trim sides to fit baking dish. Place crust over filling. Spray crust with cooking spray.

Bake 14 to 16 minutes or until browned. Reduce oven temperature to 350°F.

Carefully spoon remaining filling over baked pastry; arrange pecan halves on top in decorative fashion.

Bake 30 minutes longer or until set. Cool 20 minutes on cooling rack. Serve warm cobbler with vanilla ice cream.

KING RANCH BEEF CASSEROLE


KING RANCH BEEF CASSEROLE
Yield: 5-6 servings

Prep Time: 20 minutes

Cook Time: 40 minutes

Total Time: 1 hour

INGREDIENTS:
2 lbs. lean ground beef
1 medium onion, diced
1 cup bell pepper, diced
dash of salt
1 10 3/4 oz. can cream of mushroom
1 10 3/4 oz. can cream of chicken
1 10 oz. can mild rotel tomatoes, drained
1/4 tsp garlic powder
1/2 tsp chili powder
2 1/2 cups cheddar cheese, grated
10 corn tortillas

DIRECTIONS:
Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

Heat a skillet over medium heat and add the beef and onions. When meat has almost cooked all the way add the bell pepper and sprinkle with a dash of salt. When the meat is brown and thoroughly cooked drain the grease from the pan.

Heat a medium size sauce pan over low/medium heat. Add the cream of mushroom, cream of chicken, rotel tomatoes, garlic powder and chili powder. Stir and cook until the mixture is warm and then turn off the heat.

Tear each tortilla into pieces and dip each piece into the sauce mixture. (Does not have to be well coated in the mixture or you will use it all up and won't have enough for the dish) Place the tortillas down in a large casserole dish. Then top with half of the meat mixture and then half of the sauce. Sprinkle 2 cups of the cheese over the sauce and then repeat the layers finishing with the rest of the cheese.

Cook for 40 minutes
@[117995415057368:274:Through A Country Momma's Eyes]













KING RANCH BEEF CASSEROLE
Yield: 5-6 servings

Prep Time: 20 minutes

Cook Time: 40 minutes

Total Time: 1 hour

INGREDIENTS:
2 lbs. lean ground beef
1 medium onion, diced
1 cup bell pepper, diced
dash of salt
1 10 3/4 oz. can cream of mushroom
1 10 3/4 oz. can cream of chicken
1 10 oz. can mild rotel tomatoes, drained
1/4 tsp garlic powder
1/2 tsp chili powder
2 1/2 cups cheddar cheese, grated
10 corn tortillas

DIRECTIONS:
Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

Heat a skillet over medium heat and add the beef and onions. When meat has almost cooked all the way add the bell pepper and sprinkle with a dash of salt. When the meat is brown and thoroughly cooked drain the grease from the pan.

Heat a medium size sauce pan over low/medium heat. Add the cream of mushroom, cream of chicken, rotel tomatoes, garlic powder and chili powder. Stir and cook until the mixture is warm and then turn off the heat.

Tear each tortilla into pieces and dip each piece into the sauce mixture. (Does not have to be well coated in the mixture or you will use it all up and won't have enough for the dish) Place the tortillas down in a large casserole dish. Then top with half of the meat mixture and then half of the sauce. Sprinkle 2 cups of the cheese over the sauce and then repeat the layers finishing with the rest of the cheese.

Cook for 40 minutes

How long does it take to decompose

17 Plants You Grow from Kitchen Scraps


http://www.in5d.com/17-plants-from-kitchen-scraps.html

Study Finds Monsanto’s GM Corn Nutritionally Dead, Highly Toxic

Odyssey

Herbs For Hot Flashes


It's often said that nearing retirement age is a liberating experience for women especially once children have all grown up and you can start focusing on yourself. But liberating is hardly a term to describe symptoms of menopause once you go through it. While different women may have different symptoms, research shows that up to 85% of women report having hot flashes particularly within the first 2 years of menopause. [1]
Herbs For Hot Flashes
Top 10 Herbs For Hot Flashes image to repin / share
Herbs background pic © Africa Studio - Fotolia.com
The exact cause behind hot flashes remains unknown although studies suggest it can be due to hormonal changes produced by the hypothalamus. These hot flashes can occur anywhere along a woman's face or upper body and may range from warmth to sweating to chills [2] which can severely affect mood, concentration and sleep. [3]
Hormonal therapy is often used to relieve hot flashes but this has been linked to increased risk for breast cancer, encouraging many to turn towards natural remedies like herbs instead. [4] While most researches on hot flashes are focused on treatment, [3] studies conducted are still relatively young and limited. Nonetheless, certain herbs do show promising results such as these 10:


10 Herbs For Hot Flashes

Red Clover
When Austrian researchers from the Division of Obstetrics and Gynaecology assessed the effects of red clover isoflavone supplements in 109 postmenopausal women by randomly giving them 2 capsules everyday for 3 months, they found that compared to those under placebo, red clover intake reduced overall menopausal symptoms with no apparent side effects. [5] The phyto-estrogen enriched isoflavone was found to decrease both intensity and frequency of hot flashes. [1]
Sage
One study that involved giving 71 participants 1 tablet of fresh sage leaves everyday for a 2 month period demonstrated sage's clinical value in the treatment of hot flashes and other menopausal symptoms. Sage was shown to significantly decrease intensity of hot flashes by 50% after 4 weeks use and as much as 64% after 8 weeks use. Frequency of hot flashes was also found to reduce week after week within the 8 week period. [6]Organic sage may also be taken by drinking few cups of its tea daily. [1]
Soy
Like red clover, soy products are rich in isoflavones that correct hormone imbalance. In a systematic review of 277 publications and 17 randomized controlled trials, analyses revealed that isoflavones in soybean greatly decreased hot flashes severity by 26.2% as opposed to those taking placebo. [7] However, since the safety and efficacy of some soy supplements remain questionable, doctors still recommend to obtain soy from natural sources like tofu and soy milk. [2]
Black Cohosh
Although this is a popular herbal remedy for menopause, experts are still trying to unlock the mechanisms behind its efficacy resulting in various studies with mixed if not inconclusive results. But one expert in medicinal plants mentioned that this herb stimulated the hypothalamus-- the same area that triggers hot flashes. [8] Other studies associate black cohosh to the pharmaceutical estrogen in alleviating hot flashes while one study revealed it can prevent excessive sweating. [1]
Flaxseed
Although this herb has also produced researches with debatable results, several clinical trials have found it to be enriched with lignans which are confirmed to stabilize estrogen levels and possess antioxidant properties. Consequently, one French study of over 58,000 postmenopausal women found that flaxseed intake can reduce breast cancer risks. [3]
Although many data on botanical treatments for hot flashes are sometimes controversial with some findings seemingly based on subjective opinions, scientists are making progress in isolating active compounds that can eventually result in formulating treatments with more hopeful results. [4]
Ginseng
Unfortunately, hot flashes are just one of the major discomforts which women have to go through on their menopausal stage. The availability of herbal plants like ginseng comes very handy in dealing with hot flashes. Researchers concluded that ginseng supplementation plays a major role in stimulating the ovaries which result to the production of estrogen. Normally, women with low levels of estrogen suffer from hot flashes. [9]
Licorice
In a study conducted in United Kingdom, researchers concluded that consumption of licorice helps in reducing the possibility of hot flashes to occur by almost 80%. As mentioned earlier, low level of estrogen in the body is usually blamed for the occurrence of this symptom.
Scientific studies show that licorice root is an excellent source of phytoestrogen isoflavonoid which is considered as a good plant-based source of estrogen. This compound normally triggers the occurrence of fluctuating hormones in women. [10]
Dong Quai
Traditionally used as medicine, tonic and spice in Japan, China and Korea, dong quai was found to be an excellent herb for women suffering from hot flashes. Often referred as the female ginseng, dong quai is believed to be an good herb for hot flashes primarily because of its estrogen-like effects. [11] In a scientific study conducted in Israel, results showed that almost half of the respondents have noticed the disappearance of hot flashes. [12]
Motherwort
Hot flashes are normally accompanied by a couple of other discomforting symptoms. Motherwort is an excellent herb that doesn’t just help in dealing hot flashes. It also aids in driving away other disturbing menopausal symptoms like dizziness and light-headedness. It actually helps in reducing the frequency, duration and severity of hot flashes. [13]
Since the 1600s, motherwort has been in used by the European culture due to its calming effects which makes it an excellent natural solution to insomnia, anxiety, depression and of course, hot flashes. [14]
Damiana
For decades, natural and alternative medicine practitioners have been using damiana in helping people deal with symptoms of menopause, especially hot flashes. Insufficient levels of progesterone and estrogen in the body are the usual subject of blame whenever hot flashes begin to pester women. Reduction in the level of these hormones usually triggers the hypothalamus to be confused whether a woman feels cold or hot. [15]

Herbs For Hot Flashes - References:

[4] Botanical Modulation of Menopausal Symptoms: Mechanisms of Action?http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23408273
[5] The effect of red clover isoflavone supplementation over vasomotor and menopausal symptoms in postmenopausal women. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21870906
[6] First time proof of sage's tolerability and efficacy in menopausal women with hot flushes.http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=sage+for+hot+flashes
[7] Extracted or synthesized soybean isoflavones reduce menopausal hot flash frequency and severity: systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22433977
Article researched and created by Cathy Ongking and Elfe Cabanas, © herbs-info.com 2013

Sunday, April 28, 2013

10 ways to kill ant organically




10 Ways To Kill Ants… Organically

1. Baking soda is poisonous to ants, spinkle it around your plants to ensure ants will stay away.

2. Flour & Baby Powder will keep ants from reaching your plants, ants will not cross the powder – so circle your plants with it.

3. You can use coffee grounds, chili powder, cinnamon, peppermint or black pepper. All deter ants and if you pour coffee grounds directly on an anthill, they will eat the coffee grounds and implode.

4. Grits, instant rice & cream of wheat can be sprinkled around plants. The ant will eat a piece of whichever you sprinkle, drink water and the grain expands and kills the ant. :)

5. Fill a spray bottle with 1 part vinegar and 1 part water and spray on plants. The acid in vinegar will kills ants.

6. Mix together one-third cup of molasses, six tablespoons of sugar, and six tablespoons of active dry yeast into a smooth paste. Use the mixture to coat strips of cardboard. Keep out of reach of pets and small children. You can leave mixture on a saucer outside anthill and they’ll eat it and die!

7. Fold contact paper in half, with the sticky side out and make a circle around base of plant. The ants get stuck on the paper – problem solved.

8. Cut off the bottom of a paper cup and cut a slit up the side of the cup and coat outside with vaseline and place around base of plant. You can also use packing tape.

9. Mix one cup of borax, two-thirds a cup sugar and one cup water. Dip cotton balls in the solution and place in areas near your anthill Ants will leave the plants alone and ingest the sweet mixture. The borax kills the ants.

10. Diatomaceous Earth is a commonly sold organic pesticide that will destroy the insects outer skeletons, causing the pests to die from dehydration.

Bell Peppers


Bell peppers ~ Look on the underside of the pepper, the ones with four bumps are "female" and those with three bumps are "male". The ones termed "female" peppers, or those with more bumps, contain more seeds and will be used largely for collection of seeds and replanting (hence "female"), but are also sweeter and better for eating raw. The ones with three or fewer bumps are better for cooking and contain fewer seeds.
Bell peppers ~ Look on the underside of the pepper, the ones with four bumps are "female" and those with three bumps are "male". The ones termed "female" peppers, or those with more bumps, contain more seeds and will be used largely for collection of seeds and replanting (hence "female"), but are also sweeter and better for eating raw. The ones with three or fewer bumps are better for cooking and contain fewer seeds.

Homemade Cottage Cheese

Ingredients:
1 gallon milk
1/2 cup vinegar
1 teaspoon salt

Directions:
- Heat the milk to 190F (this can be achieved by turning off the heat just before the milk begins to boil).
- Add the vinegar and allow the mixture to cool.
- Once cool, pour the mixture (which should consist of curds and whey) into a colander and drain off the whey.
- Pour the curds into a bowl and salt to taste.
- A little cream could also be added, for a more creamy cottage cheese.

Serve as you would store bought cottage cheese!

Saturday, April 27, 2013

Mouse traps

BOOKS EXHIBITION


Getting people closer to books. A place for meeting, for favoring links between young and older people. A place where people could stroll and sit comfortably. A fun place, but also a serious and environmentally respectful one. How to operate on this unique, emblematic place, without interfering, integrating into the space and respecting its privileged environment? We had to choose noble materials which blended with the natural look of stone: wood, metal, fabric. We had a small budget, so recycling came as the best option. Our aim was to give a second, third (even fourth!) life to pallets, wine and cava boxes, copper tubes and fair carpets. With the intention of creating spots where people could choose their own way of reading, of telling a story: sitting on benches, lying on the grass, hidden inside the tents, under the trees…
petitss1 600x399 Books exhibition in store architecture  with Pallets exhibition Books Barcelona
img 8222 600x399 Books exhibition in store architecture  with Pallets exhibition Books Barcelona
petitss Books exhibition in store architecture  with Pallets exhibition Books Barcelona

Detox Water

glow in the dark pots

light up plant pots,  simply buy a pot you like and glow in the dark paint then get to painting!! LOVE DIY as long as it works, will have to try it and find out

HOMEMADE FLOUR TORTILLAS






HOMEMADE FLOUR TORTILLAS:
3c flour
1tsp salt
1/3c oil
1c warm water

 Combine all ingredients until it forms a dough. Roll into a big ball and take about 1"-2" pieces off. Pat flat with your hands or use a rolling pin. Put on a griddle on the stove and let the sides cook until there are lil brown specks.

pallet corner idea

After a long winter of indulging in comfort foods, you may feel like you need to press a reset button on your body for spring. The good news is it’s possible to rid your body of toxins and restore alkalinity simply by eating right. Here are seven of my favorite foods to help detoxify, hydrate, and refresh your body all naturally, just in time for spring and summer!


Berry Green Smoothies
Start your day on a healthy note by blending together a cup of greens like spinach, kale, and celery with a handful of berries to make a delicious smoothie. These leafy greens contain chlorophyll, a molecule that helps eliminate harmful environmental toxins that can contribute to illness and liver damage. The berries’ bounty of antioxidants and enzymes help fight free-radical damage that may lead to disease, and their sweetness takes over the more bitter taste of the greens—you won’t even notice they’re in there!
Green Tea
Polyphenols, antioxidant-rich phytochemicals found in green tea leaves, help to detoxify the body by eliminating harmful free radicals. Studies have also shown that increased consumption of green tea may reduce your risk of several cancers. And that's not all: Research has linked drinking green tea to improving memory and reducing belly fat when combined with exercise, thanks to the catechin EGCG, a powerful antioxidant. Win-win!
Want to detox sans the caffeine? Herbal "detox" teas—Yogi Detox is one of my favorite brands—contain a blend of caffeine-free herbs with special cleansing properties.

Curry Powder
The main spice in curry powder, turmeric gets it beautiful yellow color from a compound called curcumin. In holistic medicine, curcumin is used to help aid with digestive disorders and liver issues. Curry powder is also an anti-inflammatory and contributes to the production of glutathione, a powerful liver-protecting antioxidant. Next time you’re in the kitchen, reap the benefits by sprinkling some curry powder on eggs, roasted veggies, lentils, or chicken masala.

Cabbage
Cabbage, made up of approximately 92 percent water, is a natural diuretic that can help expel excess fluids from the body, so you can’t go wrong by filling up on this water-based food. It’s packed with glucosinolates, organic compounds that contain nitrogen and sulfur which help flush out unwanted toxins. Plus, cabbage delivers a good dose of many essential vitamins, including C, K, E, and A, minerals, dietary fiber, and folic acid. Click here for a yummy salad 

Detox Apple and Cabbage Salad

Detox Apple and Cabbage Salad
whole foods as FWB, or "foods with benefits," meaning they'll give back to you—all you have to do is consume them, and let the nutrients do their work! The FWB in this salad are cabbage, apples, and fennel.Cabbage, a natural diuretic, helps expel excess fluids in the body. Fennel seeds are full of antioxidants that help to de-bloat and are naturally anti-inflammatory. Apples contain pectin, a fiber that aids in digestion.
Serves: 4
Ingredients:
Dressing:
2 tablespoons apple cider vinegar
1/8 teaspoon cayenne pepper
1/3 cup nonfat Greek yogurt
2 teaspoons agave nectar
1 teaspoon fennel seeds
1/2 teaspoon sea salt
Salad:
1/2 head savoy cabbage
1/2 head red cabbage
1 Fuji apple
1/4 red onion
1/2 cup walnuts, roughly chopped
1/2 cup golden raisins
Directions:
1. To make dressing, place all ingredients in a small bowl. Whisk to combine.
2. Using a mandoline or sharp knife (for best results, invest in a nice-quality mandoline), thinly slice cabbages, apple, and red onion to resemble extremely fine confetti. Transfer to a large bowl and add walnuts and raisins. Toss gently to combine. Drizzle with dressing. Using salad tongs, mix until evenly dressed.
Nutrition score per serving: 278 calories, 10g fat (1g saturated), 44g carbs, 9g protein, 9g fiber, 30g sugars, 371mgsodium
Adapted from Cook Yourself Sexy by Candice Kumai, Rodale Books, 2012

Water
The best things in life are free—including tap water. Start off your morning with a glass of water, and stay hydrated all day by carrying a reusable water bottle (I bring a Klean Kanteen with me everywhere!). Drinking water before a meal can help take the edge off hunger, and of course it's important to drink up before and after a workout. Aim for nine cups a day, as recommended by Mayo Clinic, to help flush out toxins through your liver and kidneys.

Pineapple
Fresh pineapple is not only sweet and delicious, but it also aids in detoxing your body, thanks to the presence of bromelian, a powerful digestive enzyme. This enzyme has been proven to aid in digesting protein, breaking down fats, and reducing inflammation. Pineapple is also packed with manganese, which has been recommended by nutritionists as a way to boost your mood if you’re experiencing symptoms of PMS—how’s that for an added bonus?

Lemon
Drinking a glass of water infused with lemon (or adding lemon to a mug of hot water) is a proven strategy to help cleanse your body. Lemons contain antibacterial properties that help purify the blood and balance the pH level of your colon. The citrus fruit's vitamin C will also help boost your immunity. Lemon juice is so versatile in cooking—you can add it to salad dressings, marinades,