Thursday, April 25, 2013

Uses for mint


Crafty Uses for the Mint from Your Garden ►

1. mint extract: Although culinary uses, such as homemade mint chocolate chip ice cream, may first come to mind, you can also use homemade mint extract in a variety of bath and body recipes. Because the smell of mint is refreshing and energizing, I put my homemade mint extract into a killer coffee and mint hot-process soap that’s the best thing you’ll ever have smelt first thing in the morning.

2. mint sachet: Because the scent of mint can ease nausea, a small sachet (tutorial via Checkout Girl) filled with dried mint is a very soothing thing to sniff. Laid on the pillow next to someone with a yucky tummy, a mint-filled sachet is a small comfort, and if the dried mint is also mixed with lavender buds, then the poor soul just might be soothed enough to drift off to sleep. As Checkout Girl shows, even the simplest sewn sachet can be elaborately embellished.

3. mint-infused vinegar: Do you use vinegar for cleaning, as a laundry rinse, in the bath, or with baking soda as a replacement for shampoo? If you do, you’ll have more than just culinary uses for these herbal vinegar recipes from Prairieland Herbs. While mint-infused vinegar in your spray cleaner or laundry rinse will add a pleasant scent to your cleaning routine, vinegar infused with mint and rosemary is said to be excellent for dandruff control.

4. bath tea: While a handful of rose petals and dried herbs is a romantic addition to a bath, finicky drains don’t appreciate them. A bath tea, such as the one in this tutorial from Radmegan, contains all the lovely herbs in a handmade tea bag, for efficient dispersal of the essences in the bathtub AND efficient clean-up afterwards. Mint is said to be helpful in alleviating acne, and the delicious scent that wafts up from the warm water as you soak doesn’t hurt, either!

5. dried mint: Many of these projects require dried mint. If you don’t know how to dry your herbs, check out this article on drying fresh herbs over at The Herb Companion. Covering hang drying, oven drying, screen drying, and refrigerator drying, the only method that the article doesn’t cover is the dehydrator.

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Crafty Uses for the Mint from Your Garden ►

1. mint extract: Although culinary uses, such as homemade mint chocolate chip ice cream, may first come to mind, you can also use homemade mint extract in a variety of bath and body recipes. Because the smell of mint is refreshing and energizing, I put my homemade mint extract into a killer coffee and mint hot-process soap that’s the best thing you’ll ever have smelt first thing in the morning.

2. mint sachet: Because the scent of mint can ease nausea, a small sachet (tutorial via Checkout Girl) filled with dried mint is a very soothing thing to sniff. Laid on the pillow next to someone with a yucky tummy, a mint-filled sachet is a small comfort, and if the dried mint is also mixed with lavender buds, then the poor soul just might be soothed enough to drift off to sleep. As Checkout Girl shows, even the simplest sewn sachet can be elaborately embellished.

3. mint-infused vinegar: Do you use vinegar for cleaning, as a laundry rinse, in the bath, or with baking soda as a replacement for shampoo? If you do, you’ll have more than just culinary uses for these herbal vinegar recipes from Prairieland Herbs. While mint-infused vinegar in your spray cleaner or laundry rinse will add a pleasant scent to your cleaning routine, vinegar infused with mint and rosemary is said to be excellent for dandruff control.

4. bath tea: While a handful of rose petals and dried herbs is a romantic addition to a bath, finicky drains don’t appreciate them. A bath tea, such as the one in this tutorial from Radmegan, contains all the lovely herbs in a handmade tea bag, for efficient dispersal of the essences in the bathtub AND efficient clean-up afterwards. Mint is said to be helpful in alleviating acne, and the delicious scent that wafts up from the warm water as you soak doesn’t hurt, either!

5. dried mint: Many of these projects require dried mint. If you don’t know how to dry your herbs, check out this article on drying fresh herbs over at The Herb Companion. Covering hang drying, oven drying, screen drying, and refrigerator drying, the only method that the article doesn’t cover is the dehydrator.